Share on Social Media

Show Your Support of #DiabetesAccessMatters

Use the Twibbon link here and add the Diabetes Access Matters logo to your Facebook and Twitter profile pictures.

Graphics to Share on Social Media

Download these graphics to share on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Tag: www.diabetespac.org/access-action-center

#DiabetesAccessMatters 10.1 (4)

#DiabetesAccessMatters 8.1 (2)

#DiabetesAccessMatters 9.1 (1)

Do you Tweet?

Tweet Awareness About #DiabetesAccessMatters

Please choose one (or more) and Tweet from your own Twitter handle to raise awareness about why #diabetesaccessmatters.

Restricted access to prescribed treatment? No! http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 #diabetesaccessmatters Click To Tweet How can the #DOC tell insurers #diabetesaccessmatters? http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet 29M patients with #diabetes. 29M treatment plans. http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 #diabetesaccessmatters Click To Tweet Restricting access restricts best outcomes for patients. http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 #diabetesaccessmatters Click To Tweet Take action now to tell insurers that your #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet Treatment decisions should be prescribed, not dictated by insurers. http://bit.ly/29aq4X0… Click To Tweet

Tweet Health Insurers About #DiabetesAccessMatters

Please choose one (or more) and Tweet from your own Twitter handle to let the top health insurers' CEOs and CMOs (Chief Medical Officers) that #diabetesaccessmatters.

Aetna – Harold L. Paz, M.D., M.S., Chief Medical Officer and Mark Bertolini, CEO

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @drhpaz? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @mtbert? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

Anthem, Inc.

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @anthemInc? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

CambiaHealth – Richard Popiel, MD, Chief Medical Officer

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @rpopiel? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @cambia? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

Cigna Health Insurance

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @cigna ? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

Health Care Service Corporation (HCSC) – Stephen Ondra, MD, Enterprise Chief Medical Officer

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @StephenOndra? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @HCSC ? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

 

Emblemhealth Group

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @EmblemHealth? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

Humana – Bruce Broussard, CEO

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @BruceDBroussard? #diabetesaccessmatters… Click To Tweet Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @humana? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

Kaiser Permanente – Bernard Tyson, CEO

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @bernardjtyson? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @KPShare? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

Magellan Health

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @magellanhealth? #diabetesaccessmatters… Click To Tweet

UnitedHealth Group

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @myUHC ? #diabetesaccessmatters http://bit.ly/29aq4X0 Click To Tweet

WellCare Health Plans

Who knows the patient better? Their medical team or you, @wellcare_health? #diabetesaccessmatters… Click To Tweet

Quotes You Can Use about #DiabetesAccessMatters

There is no such thing as the typical patient: different patients make different choices in different situations.

People with diabetes are human beings with unique life circumstances.  Understanding a person’s lifestyle is just as important as understanding the disease itself.

Even though all people with diabetes have the same goal – healthy blood sugar levels – there is no “one size fits all” method in diabetes. Medication, technology, nutrition, exercise are many aspects of diabetes that are personal.

Clinical guidelines are important to help patients achieve the best outcomes, but care must be tailored to meet the unique patient.

Recommended medications vary for each patient because the biology of each person is different, so insurance companies may place medications that are best for the patient, out of reach.

Not having choice decreases patient adherence resulting in mortality, hospitalization and cost.

Insurance-driven medication change adversely affects patient care and access to treatments.

When insurance companies prevent patients from receiving their choice of treatment, many patients do not receive their treatment at all in  up to 1 in 5 patients.

Patients have experienced worsening of disease as a result of delays in access to a prescribed treatment.

41% of patients who faced an insurance-related issue filling a new or existing prescription over the past year experienced adverse medical outcomes, 68% had decreased satisfaction with the health care system, and 83% had problems that burdened the physician practice.

When patients had the choice of medication and how to acquire that medication, the 90-day adherence rate was 30% better than patients who did not have a choice.

Partnerships between insurers and vendors that limit therapeutic choices may to adversely affect patient outcomes.

Patient choice may encourage healthcare professionals to improve quality of care, and encourage patients to be more involved in choosing their treatment options.

Treatment decisions should be based on evidence-based guidelines that are tailored to individual patient preferences..

There should be a close working relationship between the patient and clinicians involved in care planning and delivery, free of influence from third-party payers.

The health care provider must take a holistic approach in providing care, accounting for all aspects of the individual patient’s life circumstances.

When patients do not have access or the choice of blood glucose monitoring supplies, they have a 0.55 higher A1C than those with coverage for their choice in monitor.

Utilizing these standards of care, the mean A1C nationally has declined from 7.6% to 7.2% in the last five to ten years.

The persistent variation in quality of diabetes care across providers and practices indicates the potential for substantial system-level improvements, such as incorporating patient choice and patient-centered care.

Care system changes that have been shown to increase quality of diabetes care include basing care on evidence-based guidelines, expanding the role of teams to implement more intensive disease management strategies, removing financial barriers and reducing out-of-pocket costs.

Additional strategies to improve care include incentives that accommodate personalized care goals, which means patient choice of treatment options.

Insurance companies are often a barrier to coordinated delivery of chronic care, which has shown to be an effective in  improving the quality of diabetes care.

Americans with type 1 diabetes are dependent on a small number of producers for supplies and products that insurance companies have great leeway to control patient access.

Limiting patient choice actually decreases the incentives for providers to innovate and strive for cost efficiency creating the potential for anti-competition that could harm consumers.

Only a competitive marketplace can continue to push the envelope on quality health care, develop future medical miracles, offer consumers a range of choices.

Patient use of technology has escalated in recent years because of the increased willingness of third-party payers to foot the bills, which in turn is the stimulus required to encourage industry to view many kinds of technological advances.

Insurers are finding ways to restrict coverage despite a drug or devices effectiveness, which acts as a disincentive for innovation.

Do you blog?

After posting your blog post on diabetes access, send a the URL to info@diabetesPAC.org so we can post a link your piece on our news page.

If we do not take action now and tell insurers that #DiabetesAccessMatters, the future holds more restricted access to treatment plans prescribed by physicians following the 2016 ADA Standards of Care. 

ACT NOW